In this example we show you how the SUMIFS-function works in combination with a date. The curious thing is that Excel and GoogleSheets don't save your date as you think they do. They actually store it as a number. Luckily we have the possibility to translate a date into a number: e.g. QA{spreadsheetTime}.

In the example below, you can select a start date and an end date. Perfect for booking forms.

The table contains the date-range from October 1st 2021 to November 5th 2021 in the fist column. You see the date displayed as a number, since we imported the table from GoogleSheets. The second column displays the price for that day.

The SUMIFS-function will sum all prices for the selected date range.

This example will also be available as a template. Go ahead and try it out!

From date
//
December 2022
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
The start date expressed in a number value

The first date in the table, October 1st, correlates to the number 44470

To date
//
December 2022
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
The end date expressed in a number value

The first date in the table, October 1st, correlates to the number 44470

Price for date range

Pick a starting and ending date between October 1st and November 5th and the prices for that range get added with the SumIFs function.

Show/Hide the reference date table